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Zoombombing is real: Here’s how can you make Zoom video meets safer

Use Zoom? Here are some easy tips and tricks to keep your video meetings safe and secure.

These tips and tricks were suggested by Paul Ducklin, Principal Research Scientist, Sophos.
These tips and tricks were suggested by Paul Ducklin, Principal Research Scientist, Sophos. (AP)

Zoom is the new viral app. The video conferencing platform has become immensely popular around the world as millions of users are flocking to Zoom to host virtual meetings amid the Covid-19 lockdown. The platform, however, has received flak from many corners over its poor security protocols.

Zoombombing wherein hackers and trolls enter your virtual conference and spam them with obscene and objectionable content has become a phenomenon. Even as Zoom is making efforts to prevent Zoombombing on its platform, here are some tips and tricks to keep your video chats secure.

These tips and tricks were suggested by Paul Ducklin, Principal Research Scientist, Sophos.

Waiting room

The security expert suggests users should set up a system where guests have a waiting room. In simpler words, don't allow participants until you open the video conference for others.

Zoom in a blog post explains that hosts have the abilities to personalise the title, logo, and message that will appear in the "Waiting Room." This allows participants to identify they're in the correct room. Hosts can also send messages to the participants who can be on any of the platforms be it desktop or mobile.

Screensharing

Hosts need to get a better hold of the screensharing feature which has helped increase the zoombombings. Did you know hosts and co-hosts can mute participants at any point? You can also lock the meeting to prevent anyone else from joining.

Randomise meetings

According to Ducklin, Zoom users need to set random meeting IDs and meeting passwords. This will reduce the possibilities of someone trying to take over your meetings.

"You can send the web link by one means, e.g. in an email or invitation request, and the password by another means, e.g. in an instant message just before the meeting starts. (You can also lock meetings once they start to avoid gaining unwanted visitors after you've started concentrating on the meeting itself.)," he said in a release.

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