Geomagnetic storm danger posed by fresh M-class solar flare! CME likely to graze Earth, says NASA

A strong M-class solar flare was hurled out by the Sun and could spark a geomagnetic storm, with a CME also likely to graze Earth today, January 31. Check out the details of this geomagnetic storm danger.

By: HT TECH
| Updated on: Jan 31 2024, 10:54 IST
Icon
solar storm
Slowly and steadily, solar activity has been on the rise. In the last few months, we’ve witnessed a growing number of solar flares, solar storms, and geomagnetic storms, all of which have been linked to the current solar cycle. Now, NASA Solar Dynamics Observatory has revealed details of a strong solar flare impacting Earth which could spark a fresh geomagnetic storm. (NASA)
1/5 Slowly and steadily, solar activity has been on the rise. In the last few months, we’ve witnessed a growing number of solar flares, solar storms, and geomagnetic storms, all of which have been linked to the current solar cycle. Now, NASA Solar Dynamics Observatory has revealed details of a strong solar flare impacting Earth which could spark a fresh geomagnetic storm. (NASA)
Icon
Solar storm
According to the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), sunspot AR3559 hurled a strong solar flare towards Earth. This solar flare was measured M6.8 in intensity. Following its departure, a Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) is likely to graze Earth. (Pixabay)
2/5 According to the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), sunspot AR3559 hurled a strong solar flare towards Earth. This solar flare was measured M6.8 in intensity. Following its departure, a Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) is likely to graze Earth. (Pixabay)
Icon
Solar flare
When it impacts, it could spark a geomagnetic storm today, January 31. NASA says that the expected solar storm could be G-1 in intensity and is likely to spark auroras in high latitudes.  These mesmerizing lights are constantly changing shape and intensity, from dim and scattered, to bright enough that they are visible for miles. (Unsplash)
3/5 When it impacts, it could spark a geomagnetic storm today, January 31. NASA says that the expected solar storm could be G-1 in intensity and is likely to spark auroras in high latitudes.  These mesmerizing lights are constantly changing shape and intensity, from dim and scattered, to bright enough that they are visible for miles. (Unsplash)
Icon
Solar flare
Earth has been bombarded with solar activity in the last few months. In July, it was revealed that 2023 had already broken a 21-year record for the highest number of sunspots which were even more than initially predicted by scientists.  The number of sunspots on the Sun is directly related to the intensity of the solar peak. So, the higher the number of sunspots, the higher the chances of solar storms. (Pixabay)
4/5 Earth has been bombarded with solar activity in the last few months. In July, it was revealed that 2023 had already broken a 21-year record for the highest number of sunspots which were even more than initially predicted by scientists.  The number of sunspots on the Sun is directly related to the intensity of the solar peak. So, the higher the number of sunspots, the higher the chances of solar storms. (Pixabay)
Icon
NASA Solar Dynamics Observatory
NASA studies solar phenomena with the help of its Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). It uses three very crucial instruments to collect data from various solar activities. They include the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) which takes high-resolution measurements of the longitudinal and vector magnetic field over the entire visible solar disk, Extreme Ultraviolet Variability Experiment (EVE) which measures the Sun's extreme ultraviolet irradiance, and Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) which provides continuous full-disk observations of the solar chromosphere and corona in seven extreme ultraviolet (EUV) channels. (NASA)
image caption
5/5 NASA studies solar phenomena with the help of its Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). It uses three very crucial instruments to collect data from various solar activities. They include the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) which takes high-resolution measurements of the longitudinal and vector magnetic field over the entire visible solar disk, Extreme Ultraviolet Variability Experiment (EVE) which measures the Sun's extreme ultraviolet irradiance, and Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) which provides continuous full-disk observations of the solar chromosphere and corona in seven extreme ultraviolet (EUV) channels. (NASA)
First Published Date: 31 Jan, 10:53 IST
NEXT ARTICLE BEGINS