NASA, Boeing team up to develop lower-emissions aircraft | Tech News

NASA, Boeing team up to develop lower-emissions aircraft

NASA will invest $425 million over seven years in the "Sustainable Flight Demonstrator" (SFD) project while Boeing and its partners will spend an estimated $725 million.

By:AFP
| Updated on: Jan 22 2023, 08:55 IST
Top astronomy photos of the week by NASA: Galaxy wars, Nebula, Moon to Sun, check them out
NASA, Boeing
1/7 On January 14, NASA released an image of Perihelion Sun 2023, the image was taken after January 4, at the Earth's closest approach to the Sun. It was taken less than 24 hours after the earth's close approach. (Peter Ward (Barden Ridge Observatory))
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2/7 On January 15, another photograph was released of The Crab Nebula snapped by the Hubble Space Telescope. The Crab Nebula, the result of a supernova seen in 1054 AD, is filled with mysterious filaments. ( NASA, ESA, Hubble, J. Hester, A. Loll (ASU))
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3/7 On January 16, NASA released an image of Moon Enhanced. The featured image is a composite of multiple images enhanced to bring up real surface features. The dark areas in the image, called maria, have fewer craters and were once seas of molten lava. Additionally, the image colours, although based on the moon's real composition, are changed, and exaggerated. (Darya Kawa Mirza)
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4/7 On January 17, the image of unexpected clouds toward the Andromeda Galaxy was released. (Yann Sainty & Marcel Drechsler)
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5/7 Image of MACS0647: Gravitational Lensing of the Early Universe Captured by James Webb Space Telescope was released by NASA on January 18. ( NASA, ESA, CSA, Dan Coe (STScI), Rebecca Larson (UT), Yu-Yang Hsiao (JHU); Processing: Alyssa Pagan (STScI); Text: Michael Rutkowski (Minn. St. U. Mankato))
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6/7 On January 19, the image of The Seagull Nebula was released. The complex of gas and dust clouds with other stars of the Canis Majoris OB1 association spans over 200 light-years. (Carlos Taylor)
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7/7 Galaxy Wars: M81 and M82, this image was released on January 20. On the right, with grand spiral arms and bright yellow core is spiral galaxy M81.  (Andreas Aufschnaiter)
NASA, Boeing
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The goal is to produce future commercial airliners that are "more fuel efficient, with benefits to the environment, the commercial aviation industry, and to passengers worldwide (AFP)

The US space agency NASA is teaming up with aviation giant Boeing to develop a next-generation commercial aircraft that emits less carbon.

NASA, whose purview also includes aeronautical research, will invest $425 million over seven years in the "" (SFD) project while Boeing and its partners will spend an estimated $725 million.

The goal is to produce future commercial airliners that are "more fuel efficient, with benefits to the environment, the commercial aviation industry, and to passengers worldwide," NASA chief Bill Nelson said.

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"If we are successful, we may see these technologies in planes that the public takes to the skies in the 2030s," Nelson said in a statement on Wednesday.

The agreement calls for NASA and Boeing to build, test, and fly a full-scale single-aisle demonstrator aircraft.

"The technologies demonstrated and tested as part of the SFD program will inform future designs and could lead to breakthrough aerodynamics and fuel efficiency gains," Boeing said.

Boeing chief engineer Greg Hyslop said it "has the potential to make a major contribution toward a sustainable future."

Engineers will be seeking to design an aircraft with fuel consumption and emissions reductions of up to 30 percent relative to today's most efficient single-aisle aircraft, NASA said.

The agency plans to complete SFD testing by the late 2020s so the technologies and design can be applied to the next generation of single-aisle aircraft.

Single-aisle aircraft are the most common in airline fleets and account for nearly half of worldwide aviation emissions, NASA said.

Boeing and NASA plan to flight-test an innovative wing known as the transonic truss-braced wing that creates less drag and results in the burning of less fuel.

The extra-long, thin wings are mounted on top of the fuselage and stabilized by diagonal struts.

NASA and Boeing said development of the next-generation plane could help meet the White House and industry's objective of net-zero carbon emissions from aviation by 2050.

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First Published Date: 22 Jan, 08:54 IST
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