tech

Hackers are selling your Facebook logins for as low as $3 on dark web: Report

Facebook is scrambling to figure out the extent of the fresh data breach that affected almost 50 million accounts worldwide.

Your private data is up for sale
Your private data is up for sale (AP)

Consequences of the latest Facebook data breach seem to be beyond repair. Hackers who accessed digital tokens of almost 50 million users around the world are now selling Facebook logins on dark web for as low as $3 (200 approximately).

The Independent reports that it has discovered dozens of such listings on the marketplaces on the dark web. The website said these credentials are being sold between $3 and $12. Buyers can purchase these user data through cryptocurrencies such as bitcoins. It estimated the value of the entire stolen data around $150 million and $600 million.

The leaked digital tokens, which include users' sensitive data, could be misused by cyber criminals for crimes like identity theft or even blackmailing. The least harm could be your log ins, which are usually email IDs and phone numbers, to be targeted for spam and fraud emails.

Research by another website Money Guru reveals that Facebook Logins have been on sale on the dark web without any check. According to the research, the process of gaining access to users' personal data and selling them in the underground market takes less than 10 minutes.

"What people may not know is that it takes less than 10 minutes to create an anonymous account, select someone's data from the marketplace and reach a payment screen. All criminals need to access the dark web is the Tor Browers, a VPN and an internet connection," said the report. What is View As feature and here's why it has been disabled on Facebook

The reports of Facebook credentials being sold online come shortly after the company said it had found no evidence of Facebook Logins being used by hackers.

"We analysed third-party access during the time of the attack we have identified. That investigation has found no evidence that the attackers accessed any apps using Facebook Login," said Guy Rosen, a Facebook vice president overseeing security.

Last week Facebook disclosed that it had faced the worst-ever security breach in its history, saying hackers had accessed almost 50 million accounts through an exploit in digital tokens.