Tech wizardry! Now, explore solar system with NASA’s 3D visualization tool

    You can now explore the solar system with the help of NASA's revamped 'Eyes on the Solar System' 3D visualization tool.
    By: HT TECH
    | Updated on: Sep 10 2022, 17:14 IST
    NASA: Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter makes astonishing discovery
    Moon
    1/6 The lunar pits found by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter have mild temperatures, drastically different from the extreme conditions on the surface of the Moon. The temperatures in these caves are nearly 17 degree Celsius almost at all times. (NASA/GSFC/Arizona State University)
    Moon
    2/6 NASA Moon recently tweeted, "Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter images of pits indicate that the Moon has caves. Could they become astronaut habitats? Scientists have discovered that parts of the pits are always about 63°F (17°C), differing from extreme temperatures at the Moon's surface". (NASA)
    Moon
    3/6 The surface temperatures on the Moon can go from an extremely high 127 degrees Celsius and as low as -173 degrees Celsius. "The pits, and caves to which they may lead, would make thermally stable sites for lunar exploration compared to areas at the Moon's surface, which heat up to 260 F (about 127 C) during the day and cool to minus 280 F (about minus 173 C) at night,” NASA Moon tweeted further. (NASA)
    Moon
    4/6 First discovered in 2009, these lunar pits could potentially be used as location for a first Moon Base. Not only are the temperatures moderate, but these pits could also provide protection against cosmic rays, solar radiation and micrometeorites, according to NASA. (AP)
    LRO
    5/6 LRO Project Scientist Noah Petro of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center said, “Lunar pits are a fascinating feature on the lunar surface. Knowing that they create a stable thermal environment helps us paint a picture of these unique lunar features and the prospect of one day exploring them.” (NASA)
    image caption
    6/6 The particular pit used to analyze the thermal properties by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter was in an area of the Moon known as the Mare Tranquillitatis. It is 100-meters deep and as wide as a football field. According to scientists, the overhang of the pit is responsible for creating shadows on the Moon and maintaining a temperature of nearly 17 degrees Celsius at all times. (NASA)
    Here is all you need to know about NASA's revamped 'Eyes on the Solar System' 3D visualization tool.
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    Here is all you need to know about NASA's revamped 'Eyes on the Solar System' 3D visualization tool. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)

    There are several ways in which you can explore the solar system but watching it in 3D can be very exciting. And now as NASA has revamped its “Eyes on the Solar System” 3D visualization tool it has now become very easy to explore the solar system with this 3D eye. It can be known that the research agency's newly upgraded Eyes on the Solar System visualization tool includes Artemis I's trajectory along with a host of other new features.

    "NASA has revamped its “Eyes on the Solar System” 3D visualization tool, making interplanetary travel easier and more interactive than ever. More than two years in the making, the update delivers better controls, improved navigation, and a host of new opportunities to learn about our incredible corner of the cosmos – no spacesuit required. All you need is a device with an internet connection," the research organisation informed.

    With the help of this 3D visualization tool you will be able to learn the basics about dwarf planets or the finer points of gas giants, and ride alongside no fewer than 126 space missions past and present – including Perseverance during its harrowing entry, descent, and landing on the Red Planet. In fact, you can follow the paths of spacecraft and celestial bodies as far back as 1949 and as far into the future as 2049.

    While you're at it, you can rotate objects, compare them side by side, and even modulate the perspective as well as the lighting. "The visuals are striking. This latest version of “Eyes” also lets you scroll through rich interactive journeys, including Voyager's Grand Tour of Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune," NASA said.

    “The beauty of the new browser-based ‘Eyes on the Solar System' is that it really invites exploration. You just need an internet connection, a device that has a web browser, and some curiosity,” said Jason Craig, the producer of the “Eyes” software at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

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    First Published Date: 10 Sep, 17:14 IST
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