Windows 10 is using your bandwidth to offer updates to others

Windows 10 launched on July 29 – as a free upgrade for Windows 7, 8 and 8.1 users – to generally positive reviews. But major privacy concerns have emerged post launch, the most annoying one being that Windows 10 uses an individual’s internet connection to share updates with others across the internet.

Windows 10
Windows 10

Windows 10 launched on July 29 - as a free upgrade for Windows 7, 8 and 8.1 users - to generally positive reviews. But major privacy concerns have emerged post launch, the most annoying one being that Windows 10 uses an individual's internet connection to share updates with others across the internet.

Microsoft calls the feature Windows Update Delivery Optimisation and says it is designed to help users get updates faster. It is enabled by default in Windows 10 Home and Pro editions. Windows 10 Enterprise and Education have the feature enabled, but only for the local network.

This is the same way that torrents work: A person's computer is used as part of a peer-to-peer network to deliver updates faster to others.

Considering that Windows 10 updates are mandatory for most users, the move seems to be aimed at helping ease stress on the for the Redmond giant's servers. The problem for most users is that these uploads will count against their data caps.

Users can disable the Update Delivery Optimisation but the option is buried in the settings menu for Windows Update. Users have to click on "advanced options" and then "choose how updates are received".