Solar flare risk rises! Earth may get blackouts, GPS problems and Auroras

    NASA has reported 8 new sunspots on the Earth-facing side of the sun, which can cause major impact on our planet. The solar flares that will be generated may hit Earth and these may cause blackouts, GPS problems on the negative side and on the positive side, some fascinating auroras on the poles.
    By: SHAURYA TOMER
    | Updated on: Jun 22 2022, 11:40 IST
    Solar prominence
    According to Dr. Tamitha Skov, a Space Weather physicist and popularly known as 'Space weather woman', the presence of sunspots increases the possibility of solar falers as it increases solar activity. (NASA)
    1/6 According to Dr. Tamitha Skov, a Space Weather physicist and popularly known as 'Space weather woman', the presence of sunspots increases the possibility of solar falers as it increases solar activity. (NASA)
    Solar flare
    She stated in a post that, “Our Sun continues to impress with no less than eight active regions in Earth-view. Several of these are M-flare players and NOAA/SWPC is even giving us a small chance for X-class flares.” (SDO/NASA)
    Solar flare
    2/6 She stated in a post that, “Our Sun continues to impress with no less than eight active regions in Earth-view. Several of these are M-flare players and NOAA/SWPC is even giving us a small chance for X-class flares.” (SDO/NASA)
    Solar Flares
    Solar Flares are ranked by alphabets depending on their intensity with ‘A’ being the smallest in intensity and ‘X’ being the most dangerous flare.  (Pixabay)
    Solar Flares
    3/6 Solar Flares are ranked by alphabets depending on their intensity with ‘A’ being the smallest in intensity and ‘X’ being the most dangerous flare.  (Pixabay)
    Solar Flare
    Solar Flares can cause power blackouts, GPS crashes, radio blackouts and more. When a solar flare hits the Earth, the radio communications and the power grid is affected when it hits the Earth’s magnetic field. It can cause power and radio blackouts for several hours or even days. However, electricity grid problems occur only if the solar flare is extremely large. (NASA/SDO)
    Solar Flare
    4/6 Solar Flares can cause power blackouts, GPS crashes, radio blackouts and more. When a solar flare hits the Earth, the radio communications and the power grid is affected when it hits the Earth’s magnetic field. It can cause power and radio blackouts for several hours or even days. However, electricity grid problems occur only if the solar flare is extremely large. (NASA/SDO)
    Coronal Mass Ejection or CME
    The eight sunspots that have come into the Earth’s view have been named as solar region 3030, 3031, 3032, 3033, 3034, 3035, 3037 and 3038, with region 3030 and 3032 witnessing major solar activity last week. As a result, many M-rated solar flares have been predicted to occur this week, with even a small chance of an X-rated solar flare to erupt. (Pixabay)
    Coronal Mass Ejection or CME
    5/6 The eight sunspots that have come into the Earth’s view have been named as solar region 3030, 3031, 3032, 3033, 3034, 3035, 3037 and 3038, with region 3030 and 3032 witnessing major solar activity last week. As a result, many M-rated solar flares have been predicted to occur this week, with even a small chance of an X-rated solar flare to erupt. (Pixabay)
    Auroras
    X-rated solar flares are almost 10 times more dangerous than M-rated solar flares. On the bright side, the solar flares always bring a beautiful night-sky phenomenon known as Auroras or Northern Lights, which are stunning to witness. They light up the sky with colourful displays and are easily visible through the naked eye. (REUTERS)
    Auroras
    6/6 X-rated solar flares are almost 10 times more dangerous than M-rated solar flares. On the bright side, the solar flares always bring a beautiful night-sky phenomenon known as Auroras or Northern Lights, which are stunning to witness. They light up the sky with colourful displays and are easily visible through the naked eye. (REUTERS)
    First Published Date: 22 Jun, 11:40 IST
    NEXT ARTICLE BEGINS
    keep up with tech