Earth has an extinction cycle! This is how long we have

    A recent study published in the Geoscience Frontiers has revealed that Earth has a distinct extinction cycle, where there’s a pattern of catastrophes before the eventual extinction. It is a 27.5-million-year cycle which leads to extinction. Here’s more about it.
    By: SHAURYA TOMER
    | Updated on: Aug 05 2022, 10:19 IST
    Until now, it was thought that world-ending events took place at random which caused extinction. However, a recent study by a team of scientists has revealed that Earth follows a 27.5-million-year cycle which leads to extinction.
    Until now, it was thought that world-ending events took place at random which caused extinction. However, a recent study by a team of scientists has revealed that Earth follows a 27.5-million-year cycle which leads to extinction. (Pixabay)
    1/4 Until now, it was thought that world-ending events took place at random which caused extinction. However, a recent study by a team of scientists has revealed that Earth follows a 27.5-million-year cycle which leads to extinction. (Pixabay)
    According to interestingengineering.com, the study was conducted by a team of scientists led by Michael Rampino, a geologist and professor in New York University’s Department of Biology. They collected records of major events which have shaped the Earth over the last 260 million years.
    According to interestingengineering.com, the study was conducted by a team of scientists led by Michael Rampino, a geologist and professor in New York University’s Department of Biology. They collected records of major events which have shaped the Earth over the last 260 million years. (NASA)
    According to interestingengineering.com, the study was conducted by a team of scientists led by Michael Rampino, a geologist and professor in New York University’s Department of Biology. They collected records of major events which have shaped the Earth over the last 260 million years.
    2/4 According to interestingengineering.com, the study was conducted by a team of scientists led by Michael Rampino, a geologist and professor in New York University’s Department of Biology. They collected records of major events which have shaped the Earth over the last 260 million years. (NASA)
    Almost 89 major geological events were found over the last 260 million years which have pre-dated extinctions. This included times of marine extinctions, non-marine extinctions, major ocean events, continental flood-basalt eruptions, fluctuation of sea and ocean levels, global pulses of intraplate magmatism, and times of changes in seafloor-spreading rates and plate reorganizations, according to interesting engineering.com.
    Almost 89 major geological events were found over the last 260 million years which have pre-dated extinctions. This included times of marine extinctions, non-marine extinctions, major ocean events, continental flood-basalt eruptions, fluctuation of sea and ocean levels, global pulses of intraplate magmatism, and times of changes in seafloor-spreading rates and plate reorganizations, according to interesting engineering.com. (NASA)
    Almost 89 major geological events were found over the last 260 million years which have pre-dated extinctions. This included times of marine extinctions, non-marine extinctions, major ocean events, continental flood-basalt eruptions, fluctuation of sea and ocean levels, global pulses of intraplate magmatism, and times of changes in seafloor-spreading rates and plate reorganizations, according to interesting engineering.com.
    3/4 Almost 89 major geological events were found over the last 260 million years which have pre-dated extinctions. This included times of marine extinctions, non-marine extinctions, major ocean events, continental flood-basalt eruptions, fluctuation of sea and ocean levels, global pulses of intraplate magmatism, and times of changes in seafloor-spreading rates and plate reorganizations, according to interesting engineering.com. (NASA)
    The scientists found 10 distinct points in time which were grouped in peaks nearly 27.5 million years apart. They also found that the most recent group of events took place almost 7 million years ago. Thankfully, this means that the next extinction-level event is not due for almost 20 million years, which is way beyond our lifetimes.
    The scientists found 10 distinct points in time which were grouped in peaks nearly 27.5 million years apart. They also found that the most recent group of events took place almost 7 million years ago. Thankfully, this means that the next extinction-level event is not due for almost 20 million years, which is way beyond our lifetimes. (Pixabay)
    The scientists found 10 distinct points in time which were grouped in peaks nearly 27.5 million years apart. They also found that the most recent group of events took place almost 7 million years ago. Thankfully, this means that the next extinction-level event is not due for almost 20 million years, which is way beyond our lifetimes.
    4/4 The scientists found 10 distinct points in time which were grouped in peaks nearly 27.5 million years apart. They also found that the most recent group of events took place almost 7 million years ago. Thankfully, this means that the next extinction-level event is not due for almost 20 million years, which is way beyond our lifetimes. (Pixabay)
    Michael Rampino, the lead scientist for this study said in a press release, “Whatever the origins of these cyclical episodes, our findings support the case for a largely periodic, coordinated, and intermittently catastrophic geologic record, which is a departure from the views held by many geologists.”
    Michael Rampino, the lead scientist for this study said in a press release, “Whatever the origins of these cyclical episodes, our findings support the case for a largely periodic, coordinated, and intermittently catastrophic geologic record, which is a departure from the views held by many geologists.” (Google Earth)
    Michael Rampino, the lead scientist for this study said in a press release, “Whatever the origins of these cyclical episodes, our findings support the case for a largely periodic, coordinated, and intermittently catastrophic geologic record, which is a departure from the views held by many geologists.”
    5/4 Michael Rampino, the lead scientist for this study said in a press release, “Whatever the origins of these cyclical episodes, our findings support the case for a largely periodic, coordinated, and intermittently catastrophic geologic record, which is a departure from the views held by many geologists.” (Google Earth)
    First Published Date: 05 Aug, 10:19 IST
    Tags:
    NEXT ARTICLE BEGINS
    keep up with tech