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Popular macOS file recovery app Disk Drill now runs natively on M1 Macs

An advantage of running native code on Apple Silicon processors is that the applications can then plug in to all the hardware advantages offered by the chipset, which means better performance and lower power usage.

Disk Drill can now run natively on M1 Macs
Disk Drill can now run natively on M1 Macs (CleverFIles)

It has only been a few months Apple launched their in-house processors for iMacs and MacBooks, but developers have been hard at work porting their applications to run natively on Apple Silicon computers. After Adobe, Microsoft, Opera and VLC’s VideoLAN all brought native support for the M1 chipset, the latest app to join the ranks is Disk Drill, the most popular file recovery software for macOS.

In a blog post announcing the update to version 4.3 of the software, Disk Drill’s developer CleverFiles announced that the application can now run natively on the latest MacBook Pro, the MacBook Air and the Mac mini, which all run on Apple’s own processor.

Also read: Opera browser gains 2x speed boost with native support for M1 Macs

An advantage of running native code on Apple Silicon processors is that the applications can then plug into all the hardware advantages offered by the chipset, which means better performance and lower power usage than running in an emulated form on Apple’s Rosetta translation layer.

The company also claims that rival companies’ solutions like Data Rescue, EaseUS, iBoysoft, R-Studio, Stellar and Recoverit are yet to bring native support for M1 Macs. A downside of using software that is not yet optimised for M1 Macs via Apple’s Rosetta is that Apple could shut down the feature in some regions which means these apps could suddenly stop working on incompatible devices.

Read more: VLC media player adds native support for Apple's M1 Macs

CleverFiles says that the company is “eagerly waiting to experience the coming Apple’s M1X chips” and that Apple Silicon CPUs are here to stay. It is also hopeful that Apple will resolve issues in the macOS Kernel Debug Kit that will allow features like Disk Drill to work in boot mode on devices running future versions of macOS, the company said on its blog.

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