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Activision Blizzard working with regulators to address workplace complaints

A protester with a megaphone addresses employees during a walkout at Activision Blizzard offices in Irvine, California, U.S., on Wednesday, July 28, 2021. Activision Blizzard Inc. employees called for the walkout on Wednesday to protest the company's responses to a recent sexual discrimination lawsuit and demanding more equitable treatment for underrepresented staff. Photographer: Bing Guan/Bloomberg
A protester with a megaphone addresses employees during a walkout at Activision Blizzard offices in Irvine, California, U.S., on Wednesday, July 28, 2021. Activision Blizzard Inc. employees called for the walkout on Wednesday to protest the company's responses to a recent sexual discrimination lawsuit and demanding more equitable treatment for underrepresented staff. Photographer: Bing Guan/Bloomberg (Bloomberg)

The company is facing an SEC investigation at a time when Activision is embroiled in a lawsuit that alleges equal pay violations, sex discrimination and sexual harassment at the company.

Video game publisher Activision Blizzard said on Tuesday that it continues to work with regulators on addressing and resolving the workplace complaints it has received.

On Monday, the company said the US securities regulator was investigating its disclosures regarding employment matters and related issues.

"There is absolutely no place anywhere in our company for discrimination, harassment, or unequal treatment of any kind," said Bobby Kotick, Activision's chief executive officer.

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The US Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) had also issued subpoenas to the company and several of its current and former employees, seeking information regarding the matter.

The SEC has asked for documents including minutes from Activision's board meetings since 2019, personnel files of six former employees as well as Kotick's communications with other senior executives about sexual harassment or discrimination complaints by employees or contractors, the WSJ report added.

The investigation comes at a time when Activision is embroiled in a lawsuit that alleges equal pay violations, sex discrimination and sexual harassment at the company.

California's anti-discrimination agency has accused Activision of suppressing evidence of sexual harassment and bias against female workers, alleging that the firm allowed a "frat boy" culture in its workplace.

The SEC did not immediately respond to Reuters' request for comment.

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