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Hackers are using coronavirus maps to break into your computer

A security researcher from Reason Labs has found that hackers are using these coronavirus tracker maps to steal information from users including names, passwords, credit card numbers and other info stored in your browser.

A security researcher from Reason Labs has  found that hackers are using these coronavirus tracker maps to steal information from users including names, passwords, credit card numbers and other info stored in your browser.
A security researcher from Reason Labs has found that hackers are using these coronavirus tracker maps to steal information from users including names, passwords, credit card numbers and other info stored in your browser. (Google)

Coronavirus has been declared a global pandemic and obviously, everyone is keeping a close eye on it. Several organisations have made dashboards to keep track of COVID-19. However, hackers have found a way to inject malware into computers.

A security researcher from Reason Labs, Shai Alfasi, has found that hackers are using these coronavirus tracker maps to steal information from users including names, passwords, credit card numbers and other info stored in your browser.

These hackers are designing websites related to coronavirus so as users can be prompted to download an application that will "keep you updated on the situation". This app, doesn't need any installation, shows you a map of how the virus is spreading. Hackers are using this to generate a malicious binary file that gets installed on your computer.

Also Read: A Coronavirus-themed spam is duping people into downloading malware on their PCs

Most of these websites pose as genuine maps that are tracking the viral outbreak but have different URL or different details from the original source.

Currently, the malware is affecting Windows machines only, but Alfasi expects these hackers to figure out new versions that can affect other systems.

Alfasi also noted that this method uses a malicious software known as AZORult (which was first found in 2016). AZORult is made to steal data from your computer and install other malwares as well. This malware can steal information from your system including passwords and cryptocurrencies.

"It is used to steal browsing history, cookies, ID/passwords, cryptocurrency and more. It can also download additional malware onto infected machines. AZORult is commonly sold on Russian underground forums for the purpose of collecting sensitive data from an infected computer," Alfasi said.

Also Read: Coronavirus outbreak: Hackers are tricking people into downloading malware via emails

A new variant of AZORult, according to reports, "can install a secret admin account on your computer to perform remote attacks".

Earlier this month, Check Point research had indicated that coronavirus-related domains are 50% more likely to install malware in your system.

Going forward, if you are planning to use a dashboard to keep a tab on which one you are using to make

While it's important to gain information regarding coronavirus, you should only use verified dashboards to keep a tab on it to avoid getting hacked.