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Firefox 85 for Android lets you play DRM content from Netflix, Spotify and Prime Video once again

After updating, you will see a small dialog at the top of the page when you visit a site like Netflix, asking if you want to play the DRM content.
After updating, you will see a small dialog at the top of the page when you visit a site like Netflix, asking if you want to play the DRM content. (Mozilla)

Firefox's recently rebuilt Android browser is slowly gaining back lost features, and the ability to play DRM-protected content is the latest one to return.

Last year, Mozilla released a brand new redesign of its Firefox browser for Android, which moved from the old and clunky Gecko browser engine, to the company’s modern, faster and lightweight GeckoView engine. But making such a huge change to an old browser like Firefox meant that Mozilla had to gut several features, that are slowly being added back by the team.

One of those features that has now made it back is fairly important for any modern browser - the ability to play DRM (Digital Rights Management) protected video. Firefox for Android could previously play music and video from Spotify, Netflix and Amazon Prime, thanks to Google's Widevine codec. However, the arrival of Firefox ‘Daylight’, or the new Firefox for Android removed that capability along with support for add-ons, which are gradually gaining support again.

Also read: Firefox's Proton UI will give the web browser a fresh coat of paint

After you update your browser to the latest version (which could take a while, we had to install the update manually) you could see a small dialog at the top of the page when you visit a site like Netflix, asking if you want to play the DRM content, according to Ghacks. If you grant the permission or accidentally tapped deny and want to change your decision, you can head over to the browser’s settings and configure the option on a per-site basis.

Mozilla has really stepped up to the plate with the release of Firefox 85, which includes a slew of security fixes - including the complete removal of the now-dead Adobe Flash Player. Previously, users could opt to use the Flash Player, but now that Adobe has stopped updating it, most browsers have simply pulled support for security reasons.

Don't miss: Firefox 85 blocks Flash, rolls out protection from Supercookies

The browser has also added support for Network Partitioning, which blocks sites from sharing fonts and other cached data, in order to stop tracking and probing of users. Mozilla says that the performance hit from disabling the shared caches is minimal. Users might not even notice that the feature which has been turned on by default, goes live after they update to Firefox 85.

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