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Fitbit Flow easy-to-use, low cost ventilator launched for Covid-19 patients

Fitbit Flow ventilator Fitbit Flow ventilator
Fitbit Flow ventilator (Fitbit)

Fitbit says it has also worked with Oregon Health & Science University emergency medicine clinicians at OHSU Hospital so Fitbit Flow is able to meet the needs of practitioners.

Fitbit is doing more than making smartwatches and fitness bands this year. To help those affected by Covid-19, the firm has made a ventilator. This “high-quality, low-cost, easy-to-use” ventilator called Fitbit Flow is certified by Emergency Use Authorisation (EUA) from the US Food & Drug Administration (FDA) as well. This new product is said to be inspired by the MIT E-Vent Design Toolbox and based on specifications for Rapidly Manufactured Ventilation Systems. Fitbit says it has also worked with Oregon Health & Science University emergency medicine clinicians at OHSU Hospital so Fitbit Flow is able to meet the needs of practitioners.

“COVID-19 has challenged all of us to push the boundaries of innovation and creativity, and use everything at our disposal to more rapidly develop products that support patients and the health care systems caring for them,” said James Park, co-founder and CEO of Fitbit. “We saw an opportunity to rally our expertise in advanced sensor development, manufacturing, and our global supply chain to address the critical and ongoing need for ventilators and help make a difference in the global fight against this virus.”

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Fitbit Flow has standard resuscitator bags, similar to those that are used by paramedics, along with other sophisticated instruments, sensors and alarms. These work together to support automated compressions and patient monitoring.

Fitbit aims to supply medical devices to health care systems worldwide in the coming days and weeks. It is also in talks with state and federal agencies “to understand current domestic needs for emergency ventilators and plans to work with U.S. and global aid organizations as well.”

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