tech

YouTube shares detailed guidelines on monetisation

Some of the most important subjects that have been addressed in YouTube’s guidelines is when the company allows advertising on content that contains “violence” and “hateful content”.

These guidelines offer more transparency and clarity on what content can be monetized on its platform and what cannot be.
These guidelines offer more transparency and clarity on what content can be monetized on its platform and what cannot be. (Pixabay)

YouTube has shared a detailed guideline offering more transparency and clarity on what content can be monetized on its platform and what cannot be.

The guidelines shared by YouTube enable content creators to categorise their videos into three categories -- ones that can be monetised, ones that can be monetised but only for specific brands and the ones that cannot be monetised at all.

Some of the most important subjects that have been addressed in YouTube’s guidelines is when the company allows advertising on content that contains “violence” and “hateful content”. YouTube says that it allows ads on videos that contain “mild violence; injury without showing blood or graphic content; or dramatized violence as part of animation, comedy, drama, or music videos; violence that occurs as part of unedited video gameplay.” Some examples of this include hunting content where there’s no depiction of graphic animal injuries or prolonged suffering, non-graphic injuries in sports or graphic injuries as part of unedited sportsplay where blood is shown and non-combative or non-abrasive interactions with law enforcement among others.

As far as hateful content is concerned, the company allows ads on videos containing “references to a marginalized group that are made in a non-hurtful manner as part of a public debate or comedic context”. Some of the examples of this include “news content which describes a marginalized group or reports in a non-hateful way on discrimination such a group may face such as a news report on homophobia” and “comedic content that include jokes at the expense of marginalized groups in a non-hurtful manner as part of a public debate or comedic context such as non-hateful jokes in a standup comedy routine” among others.

Other subjects included in the guidelines are inappropriate language, adult content, dangerous acts, content pertaining to recreational drugs, firearms and sensitive topics.

YouTube says that these guidelines are not aimed at helping creators to monetise their content better. “We’re not telling you what to create. Each and every creator on YouTube is unique and contributes to the vibrancy of YouTube. These guidelines aim to help you understand more clearly the types of content that advertisers may not wish to appear against,” YouTube wrote in the post.