tech

5 things about Mitron, India’s alternative to TikTok

The app is quite popular on the Google Play Store and has more than 5 million downloads. But there's a story behind all this 

Then we got to know that Mitron is not as Indian as we thought. The app is based on a source code that was bought from a Pakistani software developer Qboxus.
Then we got to know that Mitron is not as Indian as we thought. The app is based on a source code that was bought from a Pakistani software developer Qboxus. (HT Tech)

Mitron, India’s ‘alternative’ to TikTok, has been in the news for the last couple of days. For starters, the app got quite popular on the Play Store garnering a 4.7 rating and more than 5 million downloads.

Mitron has been created, according to reports, by a bunch of ex-students from IIT-Rourkee
Mitron has been created, according to reports, by a bunch of ex-students from IIT-Rourkee (HT Tech)

Then we got to know that Mitron is not as Indian as we thought. The app is based on a source code that was bought from a Pakistani software developer Qboxus.

Just to make things easier for you, we’ve rounded up 5 important things you need to know about Mitron, so you can keep up.

1. Mitron has been created, according to reports, by a bunch of ex-students from IIT-Rourkee. The core developer is a person called Shivank Aggarwal, who is a 2011 IIT-Roorkee alumni.

2. Irfan Sheikh, the founder and CEO of Pakistani software firm Qboxus told News18 that Mitron’s promoter had purchased the source code from them for $34 ( 2,600 approx). Qboxus are the guys behind apps like TikTik (listed at TicTic on APKPure and CodeCanyon) that’s another TikTok clone. Sheikh said that the developers behind the Mitron app have not made any change to the source code at all.

3. The Mitron interface and Qboxus’ TicTic interface is apparently identical. Sheikh has spoken up to protest against Mitron being called an ‘Indian-made’ app though he says that there is nothing wrong or illegal about what Mitron owners have done, they did buy the source code so they are free to repackage it.

4. The official website listed on the Mitron app page on the Google Play Store will take you to a blank page on shopkiller.in that is the promoter behind Mitron.

5. As of right now, Mitron has no privacy policy listed nor is there any information about where it hosts its data. Qboxus told News18 that they have an option of hosting data on their server that Mitron did not opt for choosing to host data on their own. Mitron has also said that they want to “operate on stealth mode” as they did not want people to know them by name yet.